10th Regional Support Group shares lessons learned

Base Info
Members of the 10th Regional Support Group hold a meeting during a training exercise at the Torii Beach Landing Zone, Japan on Apr. 2nd.  This exercise will test the unit’s capabilities to provide life support operations in response to a mock humanitarian aid mission.   U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Howard Reed, 10th Regional Support Group Public Affairs
Members of the 10th Regional Support Group hold a meeting during a training exercise at the Torii Beach Landing Zone, Japan on Apr. 2nd. This exercise will test the unit’s capabilities to provide life support operations in response to a mock humanitarian aid mission. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Howard Reed, 10th Regional Support Group Public Affairs

10th Regional Support Group shares lessons learned

by: 10th Regional Support Group PAO | .
U.S. Army | .
published: April 09, 2013

TORII STATION, Japan— The 10th Regional Support Group traded in their office and living space this week for a more austere location for five days, at the helicopter landing zone on Torii Beach. But they were not the only ones present for this learning experience.   

“The purpose of this field exercise, was to allow the unit to perform split base operations, with a mission command cell at Yokohama North Dock on the Honshu Island of Japan and the command post “notionally” deployed off island in support of a humanitarian aid disaster relief mission,” said Maj. Yukio Kuniyuki, the exercise control officer and intelligence officer for the 10th RSG.

Two members of the Army Reserve 658th RSG from Yongsan, Korea also came to observe the field exercise in hopes of taking the lessons learned by the 10th RSG and applying them to their unit. 

“We came to observe how the 10th RSG sets up operations in an austere location and what field equipment is required to do the mission,” said Maj. Heesung Park, the deputy commander of the 658th RSG.  “We want to learn from the 10th RSG because they are the only active duty RSG in the Army and are trailblazers for what right looks like.”

The reason the 10th RSG is seen by the 658th RSG as the lead RSG is based on the assistance they provided during the tsunami that hit the main island of Japan in 2012 and the three annual field training exercises the unit provides command and control for.

“The main difference between the two units is not the mission but what the units have for equipment and personnel,” said Park.  “We came to this exercise in hopes of observing the differences and working with the 10th RSG to standardize what the Army issues for equipment and personnel throughout all units like ours.”  

Currently the 10th RSG has about 60 additional personnel and numerous pieces of field equipment due to its real life missions and exercises they are tasked to perform as the senior logistical command in Japan.

Sergeant 1st Class David Connolly Queens, the non-commissioned officer in charge of logistics for the 658th RSG summed up their visit best when he said, “We learned a lot, and are going to take a lot of lessons learned from this exercise back to our unit.  We want to create a communication pipeline throughout the RSG community, and this exercise was the start.”