Be Well fitness remedial support upgrades Sept. 1

Base Info
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Peter Iriarte, 18th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron avionics specialist, performs the push-up portion of the physical fitness assessment test on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Aug. 27, 2013. Starting Sept. 1, Airmen on Kadena AB will be required to join a Be Well Program if they fail their physical training test. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Marcus Morris)
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Peter Iriarte, 18th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron avionics specialist, performs the push-up portion of the physical fitness assessment test on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Aug. 27, 2013. Starting Sept. 1, Airmen on Kadena AB will be required to join a Be Well Program if they fail their physical training test. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Marcus Morris)

Be Well fitness remedial support upgrades Sept. 1

by: Senior Airman Marcus Morris | .
18th Wing Public Affairs | .
published: August 31, 2013

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan -- According to Air Force Instruction 36-2905 chapter nine, Airmen are expected to be in compliance with Air Force fitness standards at all times. But, what happens when an Airman fails the physical fitness assessment?

For the select few Kadena Airmen that fail their physical training test they must go to the Be Well Program that is ran by the Health and Wellness Center within 10 duty days after failing.

The Be Well Program is a three-hour educational course that covers fitness nutrition and behavior modification. As of Sept. 1, the Be Well Program will be upgraded and tailored toward each Airman's failure.

"The Be Well Program is an important program to Kadena AB," said Christie Cornell, 18th Aerospace Medicine Squadron health promotions coordinator. "The program is able to cater toward individual's needs and give them the proper intervention they need."

If Airmen fail for waist measurement, there is a five-week program called Better Body Better Life which will work on the Airman's nutrition and work-outs to help lose the waistline. For the run, push-ups or sit-ups there is a two-hour strength class and a cardio class.

Cornell went on to say that the changes to Air Force Instruction 36-2905, which will help individual Airmen with their physical training test failures, brought about the modified Be Well Program.

As of August, 10,345 Airmen have participated in a physical fitness assessment test. Of those, 91 percent of those Airmen passed their test. At commander's discretion, Airmen that fail their physical training test will also have to attend the Fitness Improvement Program (FIP), along with their squadron's regular physical training sessions. The program focuses on aerobic conditioning and strength conditioning and is offered Monday through Saturday.

"This program is very beneficial to the Airmen," said Reeta Meana, 18th Force Support Squadron fitness center director. "71 percent of Airmen who have failed their physical training test the first time passed the second time after participating in the FIP."

Regardless of a passing score a commander may require individuals who do not present a professional military appearance to enter FIP and/or the Be Well Program.

"The best policy to stay in shape is to never get out of shape," said Chief Master Sgt. Ramon Colon-Lopez, 18th Wing command chief. "Not only do you have to look the part, you have to act the part."

Along with the Be Well Program, the HAWC also offers monthly nutrition and fitness classes, as well as a diet therapist who can help with meal planning. All of these programs can be joined even if an Airman hasn't failed their physical training test.

For more information on the Be Well Program or other health related programs, please contact the HAWC at 634-2499. Also for more information on the Fitness Improvement Program, please contact the 18th FSS at 634-5128.