CLR-3 Marines renew warfighting spirit

Base Info
Lance Cpl. Joseph W. Cobb effectively engages a target with a .50-caliber Browning machine gun during crew-served weapons training at Camp Schwab Oct. 24. Cobb is a data systems technician with Combat Logistics Regiment 3, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, III Marine Expeditionary Force. Photo by Lance Cpl. Alyssa N. Hoffacker
Lance Cpl. Joseph W. Cobb effectively engages a target with a .50-caliber Browning machine gun during crew-served weapons training at Camp Schwab Oct. 24. Cobb is a data systems technician with Combat Logistics Regiment 3, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, III Marine Expeditionary Force. Photo by Lance Cpl. Alyssa N. Hoffacker

CLR-3 Marines renew warfighting spirit

by: Lance Cpl. Alyssa N. Hoffacker | .
Okinawa Marine staff | .
published: November 06, 2012

A Marine yells “Half load!” alerting those around that the bolt of a .50-caliber Browning machine gun is forward. The Marine then yells, “Full load!” signifying the weapon is now loaded and ready to fire.

Commands echoed loudly as Marines with Combat Logistics Regiment 3, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, III Marine Expeditionary Force, conducted crew-served weapons training at Camp Schwab Oct. 24.

The crew served weapons shoot was part of a weeklong training evolution, which  focused on sharpening both military occupational specialty and infantry skills.

The Marines trained on convoy operations, improvised explosive device drills and military operations on urban terrain throughout the week.

“We learned proper techniques and procedures for MOUT and the dangers and intensity involved with urban operations,” said Lance Cpl. Frank L. Brasington, a data systems technician with the regiment.

Some of the Marines who took part in the training spend most days in an office. They relished the opportunity to execute field training, according to Brasington.

“This got us out of our normal environmentand into the field, where most of us don’t get a lot of hands-on experience,” said Brasington. “This week reminded us
that every Marine is a rifleman.”

The training evolution improved more than the Marines’ knowledge and familiarity with weapons and procedures.

“I can already see a boost in morale,” said Lance Cpl. Anthony M. Tucker, a motor vehicle operator with CLR-3. “The camaraderie has increased
significantly within the junior leadership. We are all in this together, day in and day out.”

The training gave Marines thenecessary experience to better react in combat situations, according to Staff Sgt. Nyan R. Kendrick, the motor transport staff noncommissioned officer in charge with CLR-3.

“Training is where mistakes can be made because once they (are in combat), it’s game on,” said Kendrick. “That’s where real things happen to real people. The best part of this training  was to see young Marines give it 100 percent. They pushed forward, did different things, learned their weak and strong points, and successfully completed this training evolution.”