JASDF working dogs train at Kadena

Base Info
Marco, a Japan Air Self-Defense Force Military Working Dog, runs toward Civilian Guard Shitetsu Hirata, 18th Security Forces Squadron kennel assistant, during joint MWD training at the 18th SFS kennels on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Feb. 26, 2014. Joint MWD training gave JASDF handlers a diverse experience in training with their U.S. counterparts. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)
Marco, a Japan Air Self-Defense Force Military Working Dog, runs toward Civilian Guard Shitetsu Hirata, 18th Security Forces Squadron kennel assistant, during joint MWD training at the 18th SFS kennels on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Feb. 26, 2014. Joint MWD training gave JASDF handlers a diverse experience in training with their U.S. counterparts. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

JASDF working dogs train at Kadena

by: Naoto Anazawa, 18th Wing Public Affairs | .
Kadena Air Base | .
published: March 08, 2014

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan -- Two Japan Air Self-Defense Force military working dogs and their handlers had the opportunity to train at the 18th Security Forces Squadron kennel here, Feb. 26.

The joint MWD training was offered by the 18th SFS commander and kennel master to JASDF when their personnel toured Naha Air Base July 2013. JASDF sent MWD handlers in August 2013 to train with Kadena's MWDs and recently brought their own dogs.

"I was shocked by the splendor of the facility," said JASDF Staff Sgt. Ryota Chinen, JASDF handler. "This training area is almost five times bigger than our training area."

Currently Naha Air Base doesn't have building search, detection, six phase and scout training facilities, and training like this helps JASDF handlers work with English-speaking individuals, explained U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Codi Carter, 18th SFS kennel trainer.

The JASDF handlers intend to share what they learned and the experience they gained here back to Naha with their coworkers.

"Myself and Hirata are also planning to go to Naha Air Base to help train or give a class to the other handlers who can't come down here," Carter said.

"We would be thankful if they could come and teach our handlers," Chinen said.

Joint MWD training such as this strengthens the working relationship between the two units.

"The U.S. Military has a long history of MWDs, so we want to help them incorporate that into their training program," Carter said. "It will be good for us to share knowledge and different perspectives."

The joint MWD training is the first of its kind in regards to the training between Air Force and JASDF and proved to be beneficial to both sides.

"It's really good experience to come here to see how they actually train, using this area to train our MWDs and what kind of environment they live in," Chinen said.

"Personally, I think it's a really good opportunity to be able to see foreign countries inside what training method they use and we also share our side," Carter said. "If you use one technique, certain task or skill it won't necessarily work for the next dog. There are so many ways to teach skills, and it's never hurts to learn."