Kadena EOD disposes of munitions

Base Info
The 18th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal Flight destroys unserviceable munitions as well as unexploaded ordnance using 50 M112 Demolition blocks of C-4 explosives on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Aug. 12, 2015. The team routinely disposes of unserviceable munitions and recovered UXOs found on Kadena. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Stephen G. Eigel)
The 18th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal Flight destroys unserviceable munitions as well as unexploaded ordnance using 50 M112 Demolition blocks of C-4 explosives on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Aug. 12, 2015. The team routinely disposes of unserviceable munitions and recovered UXOs found on Kadena. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Stephen G. Eigel)

Kadena EOD disposes of munitions

by: Senior Airman Stephen G. Eigel | .
18th Wing Public Affairs | .
published: August 17, 2015

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan -- The 18th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal Flight destroyed more than 30 unserviceable munitions here Aug. 12, 2015.

Nearly twice per month the team routinely and safely disposes of recovered unexploded ordnance and unserviceable munitions found on Kadena.

"Safe disposal here on Kadena prevents movement of hazardous munitions across Okinawa roads and allows us to destroy recovered UXOs in a safe manner," said Senior Master Sgt. Loren Green, 18th CES EOD flight chief. "We save the Air Force money and get good training that can be used in other scenarios such as cache disposals or large scale demolition when in a deployed environment."

The team buries the UXOs and munitions in an effort to reduce the noise and lower any impact it may have on the local community or Kadena's warrior Airmen and families.

"We plan these operations about two weeks out," said Green. "We have to notify all required base agencies and de-conflict any local holidays or events. We also require support from the 18th Munitions Squadron folks and the 18th CES Heavy Repair Flight (Dirt Boys)."

In all, the squadrons came together to destroy 25 unserviceable M136 AT-4 rocket launchers, one M84 projectile, two 60mm mortars, one hand grenade, five 20mm projectiles and one aircraft flare. To destroy it all they buried everything together more than six feet under the ground and set it all off using 50 M112 demolition blocks of C4, 50 feet of detonation cord and two M6 electric blasting caps.

The 18th CES's Explosive Ordnance Disposal Flight responds to more than 50 munitions-related incidents, accidents and disposal operations per year. The flight saves or destroys damaged aircraft flares, World War II ordnance found on Okinawa, suspected improvised explosive devices, and nearby bombing and gunnery range clearances.

The 18th CES EOD Flight continues to keep Okinawans, service members and families safe by disposing of UXOs that are hazardous.