Marines execute amphibious assault with Malaysian Armed Forces

Base Info
Marines with the Combat Assault Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force, return to the amphibious dock landing ship USS Tortuga after conducting amphibious assault training with the Malaysian army during Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training 2013 in Malaysia. (Photo by Cpl. John C. Lamb)
Marines with the Combat Assault Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force, return to the amphibious dock landing ship USS Tortuga after conducting amphibious assault training with the Malaysian army during Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training 2013 in Malaysia. (Photo by Cpl. John C. Lamb)

Marines execute amphibious assault with Malaysian Armed Forces

by: 1st Lt. Noah W. Rappahahn | .
Okinawa Marine Staff | .
published: July 05, 2013

TANJUNG GELANG NAVAL BASE, Pahang, Malaysia -- U.S. Marines and sailors with Landing Force Company conducted amphibious assault operations alongside Malaysian Armed Forces soldiers at Batu Beach, Pahang, Malaysia, June 20-21, during Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training 2013.

For MAF soldiers participating in CARAT 2013, this was a unique opportunity to conduct ship-to-shore raids using assault amphibious vehicles launched from the USS Tortuga.

More than 100 MAF soldiers boarded the USS Tortuga where they partnered with U.S. Marines of Company I, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force, in preparation for the amphibious raid, according to MAF Maj. Larry Mike, the commander of Company A, 1st Battalion, 8th Paratroopers, MAF.

“This was the first time these MAF forces conducted an amphibious raid from ship to shore on the U.S. AAVs,” said Mike. “The men were excited, and felt very fortunate to have this experience and opportunity to train with the U.S. Marines.”

Marines assigned to Combat Assault Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III MEF, provided ship-to-shore capabilities via their AAVs for the Landing Force Company Marines and MAF soldiers.

The AAVs traveled nearly six nautical miles across open water from the USS Tortuga to the landing site to accomplish the bilateral amphibious assault, according to U.S. Marine 1st Lt. Ryan M. Rice, an AAV platoon commander with CAB.

“It was a long movement for us, but the weather conditions were favorable and allowed us to get the troops on land in good time, so they could successfully execute the raid,” said Rice.

In addition to the amphibious- based operations, Marines and MAF soldiers partnered for jungle warfare training, sniper employment, combat marksmanship and a demonstration of Marine Corps martial arts program techniques.

“It was evident through the Malaysian Armed Forces’ professionalism and proficiency that they worked hard preparing for this operation,” said U.S. Marine 1st Lt. Tyler A. Kistner, the weapons platoon commander with Co. I. “I was very impressed by their level of discipline and work ethic. This was a great opportunity for our forces to work together, learn from one another, and build lasting relationships.”

The Marines are scheduled to re-embark aboard the USS Tortuga and sail to the Republic of the Philippines to conduct further training with regional partners.

CARAT is a series of bilateral military exercises between the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps and the armed forces of Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Republic of the Philippines, Singapore, the Kingdom of Thailand and Timor-Leste.