Renovating mission capability

Base Info
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Daniel Davis, 18th Civil Engineer Squadron structural apprentice, checks the evenness of a brick wall Dec. 7, 2016, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Using a level, structural apprentices ensure a wall will be built evenly and will be strong enough to have structural integrity. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lynette M. Rolen/Released)
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Daniel Davis, 18th Civil Engineer Squadron structural apprentice, checks the evenness of a brick wall Dec. 7, 2016, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Using a level, structural apprentices ensure a wall will be built evenly and will be strong enough to have structural integrity. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lynette M. Rolen/Released)

Renovating mission capability

by: Senior Airman Lynette M. Rolen | .
18th Wing Public Affairs | .
published: December 09, 2016

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan -- The sounds of building renovations can be heard all around; the scraping of brick-laying tools as mortar is spread, the high-pitched whir of power drills and the sound of measuring tape spinning back into its case.

All of these sounds are from the 18th Civil Engineer Squadron conducting structural maintenance on a facility to be used by the 18th Munitions Squadron.

“This project is a Unit Control Center(UCC),” said Tech. Sgt. Jarod Singer, 18th CES metal fabrication shop NCO in charge and project manager. “This facility will act as the primary hub for all munitions storage area control. Having an up-to-date UCC allows the squadron to operate at maximum efficiency during contingency operations.”

Singer further mentioned the renovation of this facility will allow increased mission focus for the 18th MUNS.

“This will be a building where they can have a control point directly where they work,” said Senior Airman Joseph Terwilliger, 18th CES structural journeyman. “With every exercise we’ve had, the MUNS leadership has had to go to different parts of the base. Now, everything will be in one location and operating for 24 hours.”

The Airmen operating the renovation are essential with ensuring mission capability.

“This type of project is unique in that each assigned Airman is dedicated through completion regardless of their AFSC,” said Singer. “For example, if there is no electrical work to be completed, the electricians will transfer to help another craft with a task.”

Teamwork and over 3,000 hours of dedication have led to successful progress on this project.

“It gives me a sense of pride knowing that all of us together are doing this,” said Terwilliger. “It’s nice seeing how it was at the beginning and after all the hard work later, it’s a whole different building.”

Singer commented he always feels a sense of pride when a group of engineers come together as a team and accomplish a job like this.