Caring, community, corps

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U.S. Air Force Biomedical Science Corps members attend an all-call at the Kadena clinic at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Jan. 24, 2017. The Air Force's Biomedical Science Corps is a unique corps made up of 15 different specialties that encompass several aspects of the medical field. The corps is comprised of officers, Airmen and civilian employees. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Nick Emerick/Released)
U.S. Air Force Biomedical Science Corps members attend an all-call at the Kadena clinic at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Jan. 24, 2017. The Air Force's Biomedical Science Corps is a unique corps made up of 15 different specialties that encompass several aspects of the medical field. The corps is comprised of officers, Airmen and civilian employees. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Nick Emerick/Released)

Caring, community, corps

by: Airman 1st Class Nick Emerick | .
18th Wing Public Affairs | .
published: January 27, 2017

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan -- Biomedical Science Corps members from the Kadena Air Base clinic participated in an all-call with U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. James H. Dienst, Director of education and training at the Defense Health Headquarters, Falls Church, Virginia, through a virtual conference, Jan. 24, with other BSC members world-wide.

January 23 - 27 is BSC appreciation week; an opportunity for members of the medical community to gather and discuss their tactics, techniques and procedures.

The Air Force's Biomedical Science Corps is a unique corps encompass several aspects of the medical field. The corps is comprised of officers, Airmen and civilian employees.

 “Biomedical Science Corps is composed of 14 air force specialty codes and 19 different specialties,” said Senior Airman Isaiah Flemings, 18th Medical Group bioenvironmental engineering technician. “Bioenvironmental engineering encompasses everything from emergency response to occupational health, shop visits and radiation safety. Whatever we’re doing, we’re always conducting health-risk assessments and ensuring safety.”

Being such a diverse group of many different specialists allows BSC members to work with people outside of their fields, according to Flemings.

“In the laboratory we basically support everybody; from helping doctors diagnose patients to helping security forces with anything from suspected drug abuse to people driving under the influence, to aircraft incidents,” said Staff Sgt. Ashley Johnson, 18th MDG medical laboratory technician. “We’re pretty well-rounded and have an impact on just about everything on base. Our number one contribution however, is in the event of a bio-terrorist attack; we would test samples to determine what’s going on.”

The BSC appreciation week's events allow medical personnel to highlight the hard work members participate in year-round.

 
“I love what I do because it’s extremely rewarding to be a contributor to health,” said Johnson. “I couldn’t ask for a better job.”