Concussion study says one-on-one therapy helps most

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An infantryman is checked for signs of traumatic brain injury after a patrol in Afghanistan in 2014. Post-concussion symptoms improve significantly when using several forms of therapist-led rehabilitation, according to the first large-scale study of mild traumatic brain injury on active-duty personnel.  Nelson Robles/U.S. Army
From Stripes.com
An infantryman is checked for signs of traumatic brain injury after a patrol in Afghanistan in 2014. Post-concussion symptoms improve significantly when using several forms of therapist-led rehabilitation, according to the first large-scale study of mild traumatic brain injury on active-duty personnel. Nelson Robles/U.S. Army

Concussion study says one-on-one therapy helps most

by: Wyatt Olson | .
Stars and Stripes | .
published: October 05, 2016

Post-concussion symptoms improve significantly when using several forms of therapist-led rehabilitation, according to the first large-scale study of mild traumatic brain injury on active-duty personnel.

The study by researchers from several institutions, including Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, looked at 126 servicemembers three to 24 months after they had concussions.

Treatments for severe traumatic brain injury, or TBI, have been studied extensively since the beginning of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars in the early 2000s. But effective treatments for persistent concussion symptoms, or mild TBI, among active military members has lagged, even as the injury has gained notoriety from media reports about athletes taking hits to the head.

About six years ago, Congress mandated further study of cognitive rehabilitation for servicemembers with post-concussion symptoms, said Dr. Amy Bowles, a co-author of the study and a brain-injury rehabilitation physician at Brooke Medical Center.

Read more at: http://www.stripes.com/1.432230