A Gathering of CBRN specialists

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Far left, U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. James Dietrich, Third Marine Division Headquarters Battalion Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear platoon, discusses the different functions of a gas chromatography mass spectrometer with fellow service members during the CBRN Exposition Nov. 17, 2016, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. The GCMS classifies, quantifies and confirms chemicals in the air, allowing CBRN personnel to know how to diminish a hazard if one were to occur and send information to commanders.
Far left, U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. James Dietrich, Third Marine Division Headquarters Battalion Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear platoon, discusses the different functions of a gas chromatography mass spectrometer with fellow service members during the CBRN Exposition Nov. 17, 2016, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. The GCMS classifies, quantifies and confirms chemicals in the air, allowing CBRN personnel to know how to diminish a hazard if one were to occur and send information to commanders.

A Gathering of CBRN specialists

by: Senior Airman Lynette M. Rolen | .
18th Wing Public Affairs | .
published: November 28, 2016

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan -- The sound of quiet chatter fills the room where service members from all branches are together for one purpose – further learning how to protect our allies from chemical threats.

The 18th Civil Engineer Squadron’s Readiness and Emergency Management flight hosted an island-wide joint Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Exposition Nov. 17.

More than 50 service members from the U.S. Air Force, Marines, Army and Navy participated in the event, each service bringing valuable knowledge, tools and experience to the expo.

“It’s beneficial for us to work with our joint partners across the island to compare and contrast what our capabilities are,” said Air Force Master Sgt. Sean Danford, 18th CES Readiness and Emergency Management Flight section chief. “If Okinawa should come under danger, we are prepared to protect our allies.”

Strengthening these joint relationships is vital preparation for any type of chemical threat.

“The dangers are always out there, always have been and always will be,” said Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer 4 Christopher Joy, III Expeditionary Force CBRN defense officer. “We utilize our capabilities to save lives, in the event of any type of emergency issue. Understanding everybody’s equipment and their abilities allows us to conduct proper planning and determine who’s best prepared to support an incident, in the event of one.”

Throughout the exposition, each service saw the CBRN tools the respective branches utilize.

“We saw how we can complement each other,” said Danford. “Should something happen, this helps the 18th Wing because we know what our joint partners can bring to the fight.”

Danford expressed his hope for future training opportunities with fellow CBRN joint partners.

“My favorite part of today was interacting with all of the other services,” said Joy. “Being in this joint environment, it’s educational for one thing, but you also learn to appreciate you’re not alone on this island. You can reach out to sister services, which are ready and trained, and can help one another. It was the best part because the people are always the best part of this job.”