Marines fielding smartphones for deadlier, more accurate fire support

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In a 2014 file photo, U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Brent Olsson, with 2nd Air Naval Gun Fire Liaison Company stationed at Camp Lejeune, N.C., uses a PRC 152 radio to send ground target information to collation aircraft during the live fly potion of Bold Quest 14.2. (Joe Laws/U.S. Air Force)
From Stripes.com
In a 2014 file photo, U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Brent Olsson, with 2nd Air Naval Gun Fire Liaison Company stationed at Camp Lejeune, N.C., uses a PRC 152 radio to send ground target information to collation aircraft during the live fly potion of Bold Quest 14.2. (Joe Laws/U.S. Air Force)

Marines fielding smartphones for deadlier, more accurate fire support

by: Alex Horton | .
Stars and Stripes | .
published: December 17, 2016

SAN ANTONIO--The Marine Corps is fielding smart phone-type devices to make fire support deadlier and more accurate, the service said Friday.

Marine forward observers and air combat controllers on the ground will use the Target Handoff System Version 2 to quickly establish enemy positions and send up detailed GPS coordinates to interconnected networks of air, artillery and naval fire support, a news release stated, with operational use as early as March.

The system automatically generates target coordinates identified by a Marine on the ground using a laser range-finder and video uplink. The data automatically plots the information on a pre-installed map. The information is linked to a nearby Fire Support Coordination Center, which evaluates the data and determines which mode of fire support is suitable.

That automation eliminates the need for manual targeting input, the release stated, which would allow a Marine under fire to concentrate on security and to observe changes in the enemy position and adjust fire, if necessary.

“Instead of doing geometries with a protractor, we can do it much quicker on a tablet. And we can see it real time,” said Capt. Jesse Hume, an artillery officer and the THS V.2 project officer for Marine Corps Systems Command.He said automation and digital uplinks will speed up the kill-chain -- the term used by the military for identifying a target, relaying necessary information to commanders and ordering a target destroyed.

Read more at: http://www.stripes.com/1.444865