New running technique could help soldiers pass fitness test

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Maj. Charles Blake, left, a physical therapist and the inspector general at U.S. Army Medical Command in San Antonio, records a runner's stride during a Pose method class at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, Germany, on Friday, Aug. 26, 2016. Blake has been practicing the Pose method for almost 10 years and led the 3-day running clinic. Michael B. Keller/Stars and Stripes
From Stripes.com
Maj. Charles Blake, left, a physical therapist and the inspector general at U.S. Army Medical Command in San Antonio, records a runner's stride during a Pose method class at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, Germany, on Friday, Aug. 26, 2016. Blake has been practicing the Pose method for almost 10 years and led the 3-day running clinic. Michael B. Keller/Stars and Stripes

New running technique could help soldiers pass fitness test

by: JENNIFER H. SVAN | .
Stars and Stripes | .
published: September 14, 2016
LANDSTUHL Germany — Army Sgt. Mia Lawrence detests running.
 
“I hate it, yeah,” she said during the classroom portion of a running clinic held here last month.
 
Lawrence, 25, was trying to tweak her running form with hopes of improving her time on the 2-mile run. She dreads this endurance component of the Army’s annual physical fitness test, which is required of all soldiers.
 
Lawrence and about a dozen other soldiers had just spent an hour on the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center track, trying to run in a way that felt awkward at first: shortening body strides, landing under the body on the balls of the feet, with feet under the torso, leaning forward and letting gravity do some of the work.