Report: 12 sailors implicated in submarine shower scandal

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The USS Wyoming transits the Saint Marys River after departing Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Jan. 18, 2012. A dozen sailors are suspected of viewing secretly recorded videos of their female shipmates undressing in a submarine shower over a period of 10 months, according to an investigative report. (James Kimber/U.S. Navy)
From Stripes.com
The USS Wyoming transits the Saint Marys River after departing Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Jan. 18, 2012. A dozen sailors are suspected of viewing secretly recorded videos of their female shipmates undressing in a submarine shower over a period of 10 months, according to an investigative report. (James Kimber/U.S. Navy)

Report: 12 sailors implicated in submarine shower scandal

by: Stars and Stripes | .
Stars and Stripes | .
published: December 13, 2014

A dozen sailors are suspected of viewing secretly recorded videos of their female shipmates undressing in a submarine shower over a period of 10 months, according to a new investigative report obtained by Navy Times.

While it appears only one sailor has been implicated in the videos’ production and distribution, 11 are suspected of watching them and failing to report the matter to leaderships, according to the Times.

It’s unclear how many women were recorded. Navy officials told the Times they believe it’s either three or four. All are assigned to the ballistic-missile submarine Wyoming, based in Kings Bay, Georgia, and are among the first female sailors ever to serve in the submarine force.

Navy Times first reported the scandal Dec. 3, a day before the Pentagon released its annual report on sexual assault in the military. The recent, unclassified incident report informed the chain of command, including top Navy leaders, that the command investigation has wrapped up.

According to the second incident report, 12 male sailors are suspected of viewing the videos taken from August to November 2013, and March to June 2014. The videos were first reported to the command in mid-November.

All of those implicated are petty officers, most of whom had seen or known about the videos but did not report it, a senior Navy official familiar with the investigation told the Times. The official emphasized that only one sailor, a second class petty officer, is believed to have recorded and distributed them using a smart phone.

The scandal is a major blight for a community that has touted an otherwise smooth effort to integrate women onto submarines, beginning four years ago with the first female supply and sub officers, the Times noted. Women first reported to the Wyoming in late 2011.

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