Stop the violence

News
Members of Team Kadena, Okinawa, Japan, participate in a 13 km. Break the Cycle bike-a-thon Oct. 15, 2016. Each October, during Domestic Abuse Awareness Month, the Family Advocacy Program puts a special focus on the prevention of domestic violence in the Air Force to remind Airmen and the base community this is a year round mission.
Members of Team Kadena, Okinawa, Japan, participate in a 13 km. Break the Cycle bike-a-thon Oct. 15, 2016. Each October, during Domestic Abuse Awareness Month, the Family Advocacy Program puts a special focus on the prevention of domestic violence in the Air Force to remind Airmen and the base community this is a year round mission.

Stop the violence

by: Senior Airman Stephen G. Eigel, 18th Wing Public Affairs | .
.
published: October 26, 2016

ADENA AIR BASE, Japan -- October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The 18th Medical Group Family Advocacy Program sponsored a 13 km. Break the Cycle bike-a-thon Oct. 15, 2016, to bring awareness to the issue of domestic violence in hopes of decreasing the number of people affected.

Each October, during Domestic Abuse Awareness Month, the Family Advocacy Program puts a special focus on the prevention of domestic violence in the Air Force to remind Airmen and the base community this is a year-round mission.

A 2011 research study by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence looked at prevalence of intimate partner violence in the Air Force and found that nearly 20 percent of men and women in the Air Force are victims of IPV, with about four percent of the Air Force population reporting clinically significant abuse, meaning the violent act resulted in some type of injury to the victim.

“There are four categories when we talk about domestic abuse,” said Capt. Nancy B. DeLaney, 18th MDG Family Advocacy officer and licensed Psychologist, Ph.D. “There are physical, emotional, sexual and neglect. All of these are equal when it comes to hurting the victim.”

DeLaney added, domestic violence is an epidemic affecting people in every community, regardless of age, economic status, sexual orientation, gender, race, religion, or nationality. It can result in physical injury, psychological trauma, and in severe cases, death. The devastating physical, emotional, and psychological consequences of domestic violence can cross generations and can last a lifetime.

According to the NCADV, in the United States, one in three women and one in four men have been physically abused by an intimate partner and IPV accounts for 15 percent of all violent crime.

“Some people who are being abused feel like they can’t trust the system,” said DeLaney. “It’s important if you see something out of the ordinary, you speak up and say something.”

DeLaney encourages victims of domestic abuse to make more people aware of the situation because if more people know about it, safety and protection can increase. She also suggests involving neighbours, friends and children on what to do in a dangerous situation.

Below is a list of resources to utilize if you or someone you know needs help combating domestic violence:

• Call 911 if in immediate danger
• Domestic Abuse Victim Advocate 24/7 at 070-1428-0987
• Kadena Family Advocacy Program at 634-0433.
• Military OneSource http://www.militaryonesource.mil/abuse?
content_id=266706 or call 800-342-9647
• National Domestic Violence Hotline at 800-799-SAFE (7233) or http://www.thehotline.org
• Department of Defense Child Abuse Safety and Violation Hotline at 800-336-4592
• Love is Respect at http://www.loveisrespect.org