US, Korean Marines train to maintain long-distance relationship

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U.S. and Republic of Korea Marines sight in side-by-side in front of ROK Assault Amphibious Vehicles July 6, 2016 at Suseong Range, South Korea, during a Korean Marine Exchange Program. The goal of the KMEP is to sustain the combined force and enhance the ROK-U.S. team at the tactical level to build combined warfighting capabilities. Amaia Unanue/U.S. Marine Corps
From Stripes.com
U.S. and Republic of Korea Marines sight in side-by-side in front of ROK Assault Amphibious Vehicles July 6, 2016 at Suseong Range, South Korea, during a Korean Marine Exchange Program. The goal of the KMEP is to sustain the combined force and enhance the ROK-U.S. team at the tactical level to build combined warfighting capabilities. Amaia Unanue/U.S. Marine Corps

US, Korean Marines train to maintain long-distance relationship

by: Kim Gamel | .
Stars and Stripes | .
published: July 11, 2016
 POHANG, South Korea — Long-distance relationships don’t always work. But the U.S. and Korean marines think they have found a winning formula.
 
The III Marine Expeditionary Force, based in Okinawa, Japan, deploys a steady stream of units to South Korea for joint training exercises with their Korean counterparts.
 
The most recent was a nearly monthlong Korean Marine Exercise Program, which involved about 900 marines from each side and culminated with a live-fire drill on July 6. It was the first so-called KMEP designed to develop bilateral air and ground command-and-control capabilities.
 
Artillery and mortar fire rocked an area in the lush green mountains surrounding the Suseong range outside the southeastern industrial port city of Pohang. Then a line of four tanks, each bearing a U.S. or Republic of Korea flag, advanced on the targets followed by Korean amphibious assault vehicles and a mine-clearing truck.