Angelique Barone

Spotlight on You: Angelique Barone

U.S. Naval Hospital Okinawa, Japan Corpsman among victim advocates recognized on Okinawa

by: Joe Andes | .
U.S. Naval Hospital Okinawa | .
published: March 15, 2017

OKINAWA, Japan (NNS) -- A corpsman from U.S. Naval Hospital Okinawa, Japan was among the honorees during a special event March 14 at the Community Center on Camp Foster. The ceremony recognized those who volunteer as victim advocates for the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) program on Okinawa.

Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Angelique Barone, a victim advocate at U.S. Naval Hospital Okinawa, Japan, was recognized during the ceremony which was hosted by the Marine Corps Base Butler Installation Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC).

“I was grateful to have my command, SARCS, and fellow victim advocates recognize me today for my role as one of USNH Okinawa’s Uniform Victim Advocates,” said Barone. “It has also been a great honor to support and care for those Service members who have entrusted me enough to help them throughout one of the most difficult experiences they will probably ever go through.”

After Major General Joaquin Malavet, the commanding general of Marine Corps Installations Pacific and Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, delivered his opening remarks, Barone received a letter of appreciation presented by U.S. Naval Hospital Okinawa, Japan Command Master Chief Quentin Newsom.

“Petty Officer Barone’s devotion and dedication to our command's SAPR program has not gone unnoticed these past two years,” said Cmdr. Rodel Divina, the SARC at U.S. Naval Hospital Okinawa, Japan. “People turn to her for help and guidance because she cares about her fellow shipmates. She exudes compassion and she truly makes a difference.”

Victim advocates play a crucial role in the SAPR program. They provide essential support and care to victims of sexual assault. Barone is one of six victim advocates at U.S. Naval Hospital Okinawa, Japan.

“It is important to have victim advocates at a command because we are the liaison between the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, the command, and other SAPR services that are offered to victims,” said Barone. “When someone goes through a traumatic experience such as a sexual assault, they shouldn’t have to worry about scheduling appointments, or submitting paperwork, they should be focused on their recovery. It’s important for our service members to have someone in their corner that is strictly there for them, not only to be knowledgeable, but kind, empathetic, and understanding to their needs.”

The Navy Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program mission is to prevent and respond to sexual assault, eliminating it through a balanced of focused education, comprehensive response, compassionate advocacy, and just adjudication in order to promote professionalism, respect, and trust, while preserving Navy mission readiness.

U. S. Naval Hospital Okinawa, Japan is the largest overseas military treatment facility in the Navy, serving a beneficiary population of 47,000 active duty personnel, family members, civilian employees, contract personnel, and retirees. The facility also provides referral services for more than 189,000 beneficiaries throughout the western Pacific.

For more news and information about U. S. Naval Hospital Okinawa, visit our web page at www.med.navy.mil/sites/nhoki or our official Facebook page at www.facebook.com/usnho.

Photo cutline:
170314-N-TC859-034 CAMP FOSTER, Okinawa (March 14, 2017) – Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Angelique Barone, a victim advocate at U.S. Naval Hospital Okinawa, Japan, receives a letter of appreciation during the ceremony which was hosted by the Marine Corps Base Butler Installation Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC). The ceremony recognized those who volunteer as victim advocates for the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) program on Okinawa. (U.S. Navy photo by Joe Andes, U.S. Naval Hospital Okinawa, Japan Public Affairs Officer)

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