CNO asks fleet for moment of silence in honor of USS Indianapolis 75th anniversary

U.S. Navy photo
U.S. Navy photo

CNO asks fleet for moment of silence in honor of USS Indianapolis 75th anniversary

Chief of Naval Operations Public Affairs

WASHINGTON (NNS) -- Today, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Mike Gilday sent a message to the fleet asking for a moment of silence on July 29, between 11:03 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. EDT, to honor the 75th anniversary of the sinking of the USS Indianapolis (CA 35).

Below is the text of his message:

“On July 30, 1945, just three minutes after midnight, the heavy cruiser USS INDIANAPOLIS (CA 35) was struck by two Japanese torpedoes in the dark of night while conducting a solo transit of the Philippine Sea.  Despite their best efforts, the ship went down in 12 short minutes.  While around 900 of the 1,195-member crew escaped the ship that night, tragically only 316 were rescued.

While much is written about the crews four harrowing days in the waters of the Pacific waiting to be found with few lifeboats, over-exposure to the elements, and almost no food or water, one thing is certain: those brave Sailors and Marines endured impossible hardships by banding together.  And we must do the same today.

So, I ask you to pause and take a moment on July 29, between 11:03 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. EDT, to remember the brave Sailors and Marines of INDIANAPOLIS. Remember their courage and devotion to each other in the face of the most severe adversity.  Remember their valor in combat and the role they played in ending the most devastating war in history.  Honor their memory and draw strength from their legacy.

America. Has. A. Great. Navy.  Our nation counts on you and so do I.  Never more proud to be your CNO.”

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For more news from Chief of Naval Operations, visit www.navy.mil/local/cno/.

 

Photo Caption:
PEARL HARBOR (UNDATED, 1937) The Portland-class heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis (CA 35) underway in Pearl Harbor in 1937. The ship was sunk on July 30, 1945 by an Imperial Japanese submarine in the Philippine Sea following delivery of parts for Little Boy, the first atomic bomb used in combat, to the United States air base at Tinian. Of 1,196 crewmen aboard, approximately 300 went down with the ship. The remaining 900 faced exposure, dehydration, saltwater poisoning, and shark attacks while floating with few lifeboats and almost no food or water. The Navy learned of the sinking when survivors were spotted four days later by the crew of a PV-1 Ventura on routine patrol. Only 317 survived.

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