In a 2004 photo, smoke billows in from all sides as Sgt. Richard Ganske, 84th Combat Engineer Battalion, pushes a bulldozer deep into the flames of a burn pit at LSA Anaconda, Iraq. U.S. ARMY
In a 2004 photo, smoke billows in from all sides as Sgt. Richard Ganske, 84th Combat Engineer Battalion, pushes a bulldozer deep into the flames of a burn pit at LSA Anaconda, Iraq. U.S. ARMY

Defense bill would require DOD to map out where troops could've been exposed to toxins from burn pits

by Steve Beynon
Stars and Stripes

WASHINGTON — The House is set to approve a $725 billion defense bill that includes two key provisions to eliminate existing burn pits and require the Defense Department to map out where troops were exposed to toxic fumes.

The two provisions introduced by Rep. Raul Ruiz, D-Calif., could set the foundation for veterans to claim disabilities after falling ill to health hazards caused by burn pits in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait and Egypt.

The Defense Department banned most burn pits in combat zones amid a whirlwind of lawsuits and claims from post-9/11 veterans that their health took a toll after exposure. Now the military mostly uses clean burning incinerators. But the Pentagon’s policy gives wiggle room in areas where burn pits are the only feasible way of getting rid of waste. In places where troops are operating in austere conditions installing incinerators might not be possible.

Read more at: https://www.stripes.com/1.610736

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