Typhoon season primer for those new to the Pacific

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An August, 2015 file photo shows the contents of a typhoon kit are displayed on a table in front of the Exchange at the Typhoon Preparedness Extravaganza on Kadena Air Base, Japan. The contents included the basic items to get through most natural disasters that may occur on Okinawa. The total amount spent to build a kit ranges from $70 to $150. OMARI BERNARD/U.S. AIR FORCE
From Stripes.com
An August, 2015 file photo shows the contents of a typhoon kit are displayed on a table in front of the Exchange at the Typhoon Preparedness Extravaganza on Kadena Air Base, Japan. The contents included the basic items to get through most natural disasters that may occur on Okinawa. The total amount spent to build a kit ranges from $70 to $150. OMARI BERNARD/U.S. AIR FORCE

Typhoon season primer for those new to the Pacific

by: Dave Ornauer | .
Stars and Stripes | .
published: July 05, 2017

By now, in the run-up to the upcoming northwest Pacific typhoon season, those new to Okinawa or Guam may have heard or seen the term TCCOR, which stands for tropical cyclone condition of readiness.

Old hat to many long-timers or greybeards such as I, but to reinforce what you already know, here’s a primer on what those TCCORs mean, and what to do once each of them is declared, in order, as a typhoon nears your location.

This blog post is designed to get you ready for the upcoming typhoon season, what to do, where to go and how to prepare when one of those nasty things starts bearing down on you.

The most important things are preparation and communication.

There is never too early a time to get supplied up for tropical cyclones; one never knows, after the season actually begins, when one might strike. They could come at any moment. Always prudent to have non-perishables, drinking water, batteries, flashlights and portable radios and supplies for your young’uns and furry friends (more on that later).
Communication is just as vital. Social media seems to be the place where folks gravitate to on a moment’s notice. That can be a good thing – command information is usually posted on official sites and Web pages up to the minute – and a bad thing – rumors can spark wave after wave of misinformation and create a “boy who cried wolf” scenario when not wanted. Stick with official information at any and all times. Commanders’ access channels and AFN are vital sources for that.

Read more at: https://www.stripes.com/1.463967