Arasaki Masanori, a technical information specialist with the Environmental Affairs Branch stands next to the osprey he rescued June 13 at an animal hospital, Okinawa, Japan. The osprey or misago, as it is called in Japan, is not native to Okinawa, it only passes through on its migratory route. After making a full recover from its encounter with the storm it is set to be released back to the wild. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Nicole Rogge)
Arasaki Masanori, a technical information specialist with the Environmental Affairs Branch stands next to the osprey he rescued June 13 at an animal hospital, Okinawa, Japan. The osprey or misago, as it is called in Japan, is not native to Okinawa, it only passes through on its migratory route. After making a full recover from its encounter with the storm it is set to be released back to the wild. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Nicole Rogge)

Migratory bird found in unsuspecting place

by Lance Cpl. Nicole Rogge
Marine Corps Installations Pacific

The environmental affairs branch receives many calls throughout the year to come to the rescue of injured animals on Okinawa.

Most calls are for species native to Okinawa.

On June 11, after several days of heavy rain and thunderstorms, a worker with the facility maintenance office found a bird sheltering itself from the elements under a building on Camp Kinser.

“They told me on the phone it was a bird with brown markings,” said Arasaki Masanori, a technical information specialist with the Environmental Affairs Branch on Camp Kinser. “I looked it up and it was a Misago, as we call it in Japan, or an osprey as Americans know it.”
The osprey is not a native bird to Okinawa, It only passes through in its migratory route.

“When I arrived the osprey was healthy, but very weak,” said Masanori. “I knew he needed to go to the animal hospital.”

Due to Japanese law, Masanori was not allowed to home the wild bird of prey. He knew he needed to find an animal clinic that specialized in wild birds. He tried the Okinawa Zoo, but unfortunately they were closed.

“I called the Okinawa City Hall next and received information on specific animal hospitals nearby,” said Masanori. “One was able to take the osprey to release it after a healthy recovery.”

The osprey is making a full recovery from its encounter with the storm and is set to be released back to the wild in the very near future.

“If you find a hurt animal on base call environmental,” said Masanori. “Each camp has an environmental office, so call them.”

To find an environmental office near you please call 637-4405.

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