U.S. Marine Corps illustration by Cpl. Timothy Hernandez; this image is a portrait composite created through the Brenizer method
U.S. Marine Corps illustration by Cpl. Timothy Hernandez; this image is a portrait composite created through the Brenizer method

U.S. Navy Corpsman participates in international exercise

by Cpl. Timothy Hernandez
3rd Marine Division

U.S. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Davis is a corpsman with 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion from Okinawa, Japan and is participating in Khaan Quest 2019 at Five Hills Training Area, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, from June 14-28.

Davis, a White Cloud, Mich. native, attended college for graphic design before enlisting into the U.S. Navy, but felt unsatisfied with where she was heading. She looked into the medical field after she had worked at a nursing home. Seeking this fulfillment, she knew that the military had medical specialties, and enlisted into the Navy as a corpsman.

Q: Why did you want to join the U.S. Navy?

A: A lot of my family are prior sailors. I tried to go to college to do my own thing, ran out of scholarship money, and wasn’t really getting anywhere. I was always interested in the medical field, but I had no more money and there wasn’t much opportunity for me in Michigan.

Q: Is that what made you want to become a corpsman?

A: Yeah, I talked to a recruiter, but being a corpsman wasn’t available at the time. I enlisted anyways, knowing I could still become a corpsman someday. I signed an undesignated contract and ended up as an aviation boatsman mate for a few years until I was eligible to cross-rate into becoming a corpsman. In the end, I still got to be what I wanted to in the beginning.

Q: So, what so you think about actually being a corpsman after finally making it?

A: It’s a lot of learning, it’s very difficult, but I really enjoy it. I did a lot of research into it before joining. I’ve had a lot of opportunities from it. I got my EMT license from this and my medical assistant certificate. There’s a lot more training we have chances to receive, and it crosses over into the civilian sector in so many ways.

Q: What do you think about participating in Khaan Quest 2019?

A: It’s eye opening. This is my first time being on a field operation with Marines. I get to see how it is to work outside of an actual hospital or clinic. It’s really cool to see how much equipment the Mongolians have out here too; an X-ray, surgical room and a laboratory. I’m really glad I’m able to be a part of this.

Q: Why is it important that more women are being included into peacekeeping operations?

A: “I think it’s good to have the diversity during operations for multiple reasons. I personally think women are able to multitask and see the bigger picture in a different light. Another reason would be the career opportunities and personal experience you get from spending time in this environment. A lot of branches over the years saved the difficult or dirty work for the men in the service, but I think now the opportunity to share that is becoming more equal.”

Photo Caption:
U.S. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Davis stands outside the medical tent at Five Hills Training Area, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, June 12, 2019. Davis is a hospital corpsman with 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion in Okinawa, Japan, and is participating in Khaan Quest 2019 from June 14-28. Khaan Quest is a multinational exercise co-sponsored by the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command and hosted annually by the Mongolian Armed Forces. Khaan Quest 2019 is the latest in a continuing series of exercises designed to promote regional peace and security.

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