OKINAWA

Food & Drink

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VIDEO: Okinawa Kitchen: How to make Goya juice

It’s not too much a stretch to say Goya is the staple of Okinawa.

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Guide to Okinawa’s popular alcohol awamori

If you think of alcohol and Japan, then the first thing that springs to mind is sake – but there are other alcoholic drinks too, one of which comes from the island of Okinawa! Awamori is an alcoholic drink which is also known as shimazakae, or island sake.

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The Okinawa connection between Awamori and Karate

Okinawa is well-known as the birthplace of karate, but Japan’s southern islands are also home to the creation of a unique distilled liquor known as awamori.

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VIDEO: Speakin’ Japanese-Let’s eat mango

If you have not noticed, mango is reaching peak ripeness on Okinawa.

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Karaage at Kariju near Kadena AB a chicken delight on Okinawa

In case you have not noticed, karaage (Japanese-style fried food) is big in this country, especially chicken karaage.

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VIDEO: Let's whip up Okinawa's famous doughnuts

These donuts are fun to make anytime of the year.

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Stay cool this summer with these guilt-free ice cream recipes

Ice cream is the classic dessert people have loved since they were kids. Although delicious, ice cream does have a bad rep for being unhealthy. What if you could make an all-natural, healthy version of your most desired treat? Well, you’re in luck thanks to banana ice cream!

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VIDEO: Okinawa Kitchen: Frying up bitter melon goya

If you live on Okinawa, you might have heard about Goya, a local cucumber-like vegetable also known as bitter melon.

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Hamby Town supermarket offers fresh deals on Okinawa

Locals aren't the only ones taking advantage of Japan's fresh fish, fruit and vegetables.

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Taste of Japan: Story behind Okinawa's ‘A-lunch’

Yoshoku, or Western dishes, came to Okinawa decades after hitting Japan’s mainland. The adoption of the Western cuisine was accelerated when the island became more exposed to American food after the battle of Okinawa.

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VIDEO: Food and fun at Okinawa’s Makishi Public Market

Makishi Public Market is recognized as a go-to place to buy fresh seafood, meat, pickles, and souvenirs.

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Taste of Okinawa: Take a food tour in Makishi Market

I believed I can, and so I gave it my all. For people of every generation, there is no greater motivation of achieving your goals than believing you can, and no greater destroyer of dreams than convincing yourself that you can’t.

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Fishing for a recipe: Sake-cured salmon

Combine sake, salt and sugar in a bowl and mix well. Rub salmon thoroughly with the mixture, then add half the remaining mixture to a zip-lock bag and lay it flat.

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Differences between Japanese ramen and Okinawa soba

So what’s the difference between ramen and Okinawa soba anyway?

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